Water

Jane Tsong, Artist

Jane Tsong, Artist

Jane Tsong
the los angeles water cycle: the way it is, not the way it should and one day will be
digital collage
2004-6
$85
How do we take for granted that water flows from a faucet, just as easily as it flows from rivers? Kids learn about the water cycle in school– rain falls on mountains, creating rivers which flow into the ocean, and evaporation leads to more rain. Are there some things missing from this cycle?
By creating this map, I am trying to make sense of some of the contradictory things I have been learning about my own life in Los Angeles. The drawing is a work in progress, and attempting to compile all this information in one image raises more questions for me than answers.
Most of us still believe that Los Angeles is a natural desert, yet only a hundred years ago, countless rivers, lakes, creeks, and springs coursed through our neighborhoods.
Things are never what they seem. The majority of the water in the LA River is now reclaimed wastewater, whose original source is the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, Owens Valley and the Colorado River (after it has passed through countless households and sewers). In spite of its unexpected source, the river has become a rich habitat for many plants and creatures.
Most of our natural springs have been tapped nearly dry by LA’s tremendously needy population—yet within two miles of my house are three prolific water sources, including the spring was the basis of the Sparkletts company.
Though we have tapped most of our other sources of water dry, our city has opposed treating our own wastewater to drinkable standards, or using reclaimed water to replenish our own aquifers… In the meantime, everyday the majority of us drink water that comes from as far as the Colorado River. This water is made of the recycled wastewater of nearly a dozen other communities, and is so rich with contaminants that it must be diluted with water from northern California to meet minimal standards of potability….
This is our existing cycle. Yet as you read this, many of us have already been working on stepping outside of this cycle– by harvesting rainwater, developing groundwater retention basins, restoring the function of old flood plains, and building household greywater systems…. There is another way…
Jane Tsong
the los angeles water cycle: the way it is, not the way it should and one day will be
digital collage
2004-6
$85     

los angeles water cycle (detail)

los angeles water cycle (detail)

 

los angeles water cycle

los angeles water cycle

the los angeles water cycle: the way it is, not the way it should and one day will be

How do we take for granted that water flows from a faucet, just as easily as it flows from rivers? Kids learn about the water cycle in school– rain falls on mountains, creating rivers which flow into the ocean, and evaporation leads to more rain. Are there some things missing from this cycle?
By creating this map, I am trying to make sense of some of the contradictory things I have been learning about my own life in Los Angeles. The drawing is a work in progress, and attempting to compile all this information in one image raises more questions for me than answers.
Most of us still believe that Los Angeles is a natural desert, yet only a hundred years ago, countless rivers, lakes, creeks, and springs coursed through our neighborhoods.
Things are never what they seem. The majority of the water in the LA River is now reclaimed wastewater, whose original source is the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta, Owens Valley and the Colorado River (after it has passed through countless households and sewers). In spite of its unexpected source, the river has become a rich habitat for many plants and creatures.
Most of our natural springs have been tapped nearly dry by LA’s tremendously needy population—yet within two miles of my house are three prolific water sources, including the spring was the basis of the Sparkletts company.
Though we have tapped most of our other sources of water dry, our city has opposed treating our own wastewater to drinkable standards, or using reclaimed water to replenish our own aquifers… In the meantime, everyday the majority of us drink water that comes from as far as the Colorado River. This water is made of the recycled wastewater of nearly a dozen other communities, and is so rich with contaminants that it must be diluted with water from northern California to meet minimal standards of potability….
This is our existing cycle. Yet as you read this, many of us have already been working on stepping outside of this cycle– by harvesting rainwater, developing groundwater retention basins, restoring the function of old flood plains, and building household greywater systems…. There is another way…      

los angeles water cycle (detail)

los angeles water cycle (detail)

los angeles water cycle (detail)

los angeles water cycle (detail)

los angeles water cycle (detail)

los angeles water cycle (detail)

 

los angeles water cycle (detail)

los angeles water cycle (detail)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: